Dirty Laundry Day Project 2019

Dirty Laundry Day Project 2019

2018 dirty laundry logoThe Dirty Laundry Day Project is a powerful community education campaign to raise awareness of domestic and family violence in our communities.

During the last nine years, the Dirty Laundry Day Project has provided a voice for hundreds of people who have experienced domestic violence. It has also engaged local businesses; community organisations; education bodies; our local police and health services. It has been promoted in the media and it’s success has been mentioned in the NSW Parliament. We believe it has truly shone a light on a difficult topic.

The project aims to:

  • dirty laundry day shirts on the lineRaise awareness and challenge long held beliefs in our communities about domestic and family violence.
  • Be a visible call for cultural change.
  • Enable conversations to begin in our communities
  • Provide an opportunity to hear the voices of those in our communities who have experienced domestic and family violence
  • Encourage community support for the safety and well being of children and create more cohesive communities
  • Send a strong message to perpetrators – as an early intervention strategy – that violence will not be tolerated in our communities.
  • Connect service providers, people who have experienced domestic violence and the wider community allowing through networking and information sharing.
  • Be a cathartic and empowering process for people who have experienced domestic and family violence.

dirty laundry day tshirts
Where can I find it?

In 2019, The Dirty Laundry Day Project will take place in Lismore, Kyogle, Casino and Western Sydney. If you would like to run The Dirty Laundry Day Project in your area, contact Amanda Shoebridge for more information.

 

Dirty Laundry Day and the 16 days of Activism

16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence ( Nov 25th until 10 December 2019) is the time we run The Dirty Laundry Day Project.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, up to 80% of women who have experienced intimate partner violence or sexual assault do not report it to the police. Participating locations hand Dirty Laundry Day t-shirts in their shop windows to raise awareness and start conversations about this challenging topic.

Watch videos of previous campaigns or click any thumbnail to see full size image

Thanks to our supporters and sponsors

The Dirty Laundry Day Project is grateful for the contributions and support of:

  • Casino Neighbourhood Centre
  • Jenny Dowell (OAM)
  • Lismore City Council
  • Lismore Domestic Violence Interagency
  • Men and Family Centre
  • Niki Gill – Founder of the Dirty Laundry Day Project
  • QBE Insurance Company
  • St Vincent De Paul Society
  • Women Up North

THANK-YOU all and the other staff, family and volunteers who make it possible.

 

Interactive map highlights extent of poverty across regional NSW

Interactive map highlights extent of poverty across regional NSW

Regional communities in NSW are doing it tougher than their city dwelling counterparts. That’s the message from new research mapping social and economic disadvantage across the state released by the New South Wales Council of Social Services (NCOSS) today, echoing Social Futures concerns for the rural and regional communities we support.

With 888,000 people living in poverty in NSW, no community is immune to hardship, but our rural and regional communities are doing it particularly tough explained Chief Executive of Social Futures, Tony Davies.

“While only 30 per cent of the population live outside the metro areas in NSW, our regional communities are home to more than half of the people living in poverty across the state.

“There is a myth that our regional coastal communities in particular are an oasis of paradise but low incomes and high unemployment rates, coupled with high rates of housing stress, mean that many of these communities have significantly higher rates of poverty than the rest of the state. In Nambucca Heads for example, almost 1 in 4 people are living below the poverty line.

“Most concerning, children are the most likely age group to be living in poverty  with one in six children live below the poverty line. In some parts of Northern NSW this figure is closer to one in four.

“With many communities facing the additional bite of the drought it has never been more important for government to take real action to address the inequality in regional communities.

“We urgently need the government to invest in social housing, early childhood education and to raise the Newstart Allowance in order to break the cycle of poverty,” he said.

This report provides a detailed picture of the extent of disadvantage across NSW with interactive maps allowing users to explore how poverty impacts people in their region.

View the interactive map and read the full Mapping Economic Disadvantage in New South Wales report.

Wording up for a wider world

Wording up for a wider world

The world is making much more sense to Catherine Ryan since she was accepted onto the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

 

The 33 year old lives in Orange and has experienced schizophrenia for as long as she can remember, disrupting her education and leaving her unable to read and write.

Now her NDIS-funded support worker, Debbie, is teaching Catherine a skill which is opening up her world and changing her life.

“I had to learn how to trust and everything with her (Debbie). She taught me how to read and write. I can read children’s books now. I can pretty much do what I’ve always wanted to do,” Catherine says.

She especially likes being able to write birthday cards to her daughter.

“I’m real happy with myself that I can actually do that!” she exclaims. “It’s helped us to have a better relationship, now we can read bedtime stories together. She asks for a bedtime story every night.”

Catherine has been supported through her NDIS journey by Orange-based Social Futures Local Area Coordinator, Frank Sheehan.

Prior to her NDIS funding Catherine struggled to get around. It wasn’t possible for her to understand bus timetables and not being able to read street or shop signs made the world a daunting place.

“Before the NDIS I struggled a lot with understanding and reading,” Catherine says. “I had to ask my mum for a lot of help with all that. I had to ask ‘mum, what does this mean? What does this say?’ I couldn’t do anything by myself. I feel more capable now.”

Being able to read signs as she goes past is life changing. “I now don’t have to ask people at the big stores, ‘what does that say?’ Because when I would ask them, they used to laugh at me. So that was sort of embarrassing. Now that I know what it says I don’t have to ask anymore.”

“It has helped me with just normal things in my daily life, like shopping. Debbie’s also teaching me how to shop and choose cheaper stuff. I used to get my dad to write down my shopping list and read it out when I went shopping. And now, I can write my own shopping list. I go through the catalogues, write it down, then I can go and do it. It makes me feel good. I feel proud of myself,” Catherine says.

Her increased confidence is also helping Catherine to connect with community: “Now I can go out in a crowd with Debbie. I’m not ready to go out on my own, but I feel pretty safe with Debbie. But on my own, I probably won’t feel safe. I’ll probably hide in a corner like I usually do.”

Catherine loves clothes shopping and especially loves her boots: “I have that many boots at home, half of them I haven’t worn! They’re all my favourite. Dad would get embarrassed ‘cause he had to walk into Crossroads clothes shop with me. Now I can go on my own.

“This year Debbie’s teaching me how to do maths and my timetables. She’s also helping me learn how to trust and communicate with other people better. The big problem at the moment is trust issues. I feel like if I could trust people more, I could go out into the community, I could probably be able to do other things. And reading and writing will be helping with my trust issues, because now I can communicate with people.

“It’s helped me out heaps, I’m really happy with the NDIS.”

Using her NDIS plan

Catherine’s NDIS supports have helped her:

  • Learn how to read and write
  • Improve her family relationships
  • Feel more confident
  • Engage more with her local community
  • Work on her trust issues

Social Futures is a National Disability Insurance Scheme Partner in the Community.
Our Local Area Coordination services connect participants to the NDIS in regional New South Wales.

To contact your nearest LAC call 1800 522 679

Read more participant stories

Wording up for a wider world

The world is making much more sense to Catherine Ryan since she was accepted onto the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).   The 33 year old lives in Orange and has experienced schizophrenia for as long as she can remember, disrupting her education and...

read more

From homebound to outward bound

Nicole was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in December 2009. She tells her story in her own words: I went to the doctor because I had three cold fingers and that's when I got the diagnosis. It was devastating. I was a full-time working mother and it seemed like...

read more

Tailored care helps Joseph spread his wings

Joseph's birthday in November last year was a double celebration - turning 40, and spending his first year as a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant.   He marked the occasion with a concert in front of 80 invited guests, singing covers of his...

read more

From hobby sketching to the Archibald Prize

When Zion Levy Stewart first started sketching people who visited his family home at age 20, everyone thought it might help him pass the time. Twenty years on, this National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant was an entrant in this year's 2019 Archibald...

read more

There’s no place like home

Just a few years ago, Tammy had reached the point of considering moving into supported accommodation due to the impact of her disability. The long-term Forbes resident was increasingly isolated and incapacitated by Devic’s disease, caused by the inflammation and...

read more

Get new stories from NDIS Participants in your inbox

* indicates required



From homebound to outward bound

From homebound to outward bound

Nicole was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in December 2009. She tells her story in her own words:

I went to the doctor because I had three cold fingers and that’s when I got the diagnosis. It was devastating. I was a full-time working mother and it seemed like my world had collapsed.

 

The MS soon progressed and I was living permanently in a chair. This left me homebound and financially it was a disaster. My husband could only work three days a week on reduced hours so he could look after me. Our combined income was reduced to just $30,000.

I couldn’t afford to ever get out, I couldn’t get a wheelchair, couldn’t see my friends. It was just depressing and that’s what I thought life was going to be like for me from then on. Before too long I developed anxiety.

Then the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) arrived. I had my first meeting with Local Area Coordinator (LAC) Katrina from Social Futures in March 2018 and from that moment my life and my family’s life has changed, out of this world. Just amazing.

With assistance from disability services provider Breakthru I was able to hire transport and a support worker to take me out. My first trip out was to Bunnings – can you believe it? Bunnings! And I loved it! 

Everyone gets a break

My friends can now come over and take me out for lunch, I have a support worker so my husband can get a break and play golf once a week. I have a cleaner and my kids don’t have to come and look after me. I can go to physio myself in my new powered wheelchair.

Now I’m just so happy and so shocked all at the same time. The NDIS has been life changing. Before the NDIS I couldn’t afford anything, I was sitting in a chair, I was so depressed. I used to do art therapy, I did it for hours and hours and hours. And I thought, that’s all there was. That’s now my life. And that’s all it’s going to be from now on.

My husband – he had to do everything. He was a man trying to style my hair! Now I have help. And now I have a life. I almost have to have a booking diary I am so busy these days!

The physio has also been great. My legs are a bit better now and she has me up doing a few steps. That has helped with my anxiety too.

I was a barmaid for 26 years, I was a really social person. After my MS diagnosis I didn’t visit the supermarket for years, but the other day I went down in my power chair and it took me hours to do the shopping with all the people stopping me to say hello.

Home modifications approved

I’ve just had home modifications approved for a deck and a ramp so I’ll soon be able to get out my front door for the first time in six years. With help from Reita (my new LAC from Social Futures) I’m going to apply for bathroom and laundry modifications so I can even do laundry. We’re looking into car modifications too so I can get my power chair in the car.

It was a rough start with the NDIS because I didn’t understand it. And letting people into my home and my life was challenging, but it’s been lifesaving.

Now I’m sitting on a cushion that’s helping my pain from sitting all the time and that’s also funded by the NDIS. What can I say, other than I love it.

 

“My first trip out was to Bunnings – can you believe it? Bunnings! And I loved it!” (Nicole)

Nicole’s NDIS supports have helped her:

  • Rebuild her social life
  • Enjoy quality family time
  • Improve her mobility
  • Purchase key equipment.

Social Futures is a National Disability Insurance Scheme Partner in the Community.
Our Local Area Coordination services connect participants to the NDIS in regional New South Wales.

To contact your nearest LAC call 1800 522 679

Read more participant stories

Wording up for a wider world

The world is making much more sense to Catherine Ryan since she was accepted onto the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).   The 33 year old lives in Orange and has experienced schizophrenia for as long as she can remember, disrupting her education and...

read more

From homebound to outward bound

Nicole was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in December 2009. She tells her story in her own words: I went to the doctor because I had three cold fingers and that's when I got the diagnosis. It was devastating. I was a full-time working mother and it seemed like...

read more

Tailored care helps Joseph spread his wings

Joseph's birthday in November last year was a double celebration - turning 40, and spending his first year as a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant.   He marked the occasion with a concert in front of 80 invited guests, singing covers of his...

read more

From hobby sketching to the Archibald Prize

When Zion Levy Stewart first started sketching people who visited his family home at age 20, everyone thought it might help him pass the time. Twenty years on, this National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant was an entrant in this year's 2019 Archibald...

read more

There’s no place like home

Just a few years ago, Tammy had reached the point of considering moving into supported accommodation due to the impact of her disability. The long-term Forbes resident was increasingly isolated and incapacitated by Devic’s disease, caused by the inflammation and...

read more

Get new stories from NDIS Participants in your inbox

* indicates required



Tailored care helps Joseph spread his wings

Tailored care helps Joseph spread his wings

Joseph’s birthday in November last year was a double celebration – turning 40, and spending his first year as a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant.

 

He marked the occasion with a concert in front of 80 invited guests, singing covers of his favourite songs with his sister Lara.

“People loved it, in fact we all loved it,” his mum Robyn says. “It was wonderful to see all of his self-confidence shining through, and just knowing that he now has the support to keep exploring his potential and growing as a person.”

Joseph has Down Syndrome and, despite living independently for the past 12 years, until he received his first NDIS plan he had never been anywhere on his own away from his family in Mudgee.

First trip away

“NDIS support allowed him to go away on a camping trip to Bowral for two weeks last year,” Robyn says. “It was such a big thing for him, giving him the opportunity to boost his wellbeing and engage with people and activities outside his familiar home environment.

“He came home just beaming.”

Joseph and his family were supported through the planning process by Bathurst-based Social Futures Local Area Coordinator Jodie. The family opted to manage Joseph’s plan on his behalf, and they have used the opportunity to employ support workers who know him and know what he likes doing.

“They’re much more attentive to what he wants to do in his life and they’re consistent in what they do,” Robyn says. “It’s a lot more personalised.

“They provide in-home support three afternoons a week, helping Joseph with meal preparation and making sure all his washing and cleaning gets done.

“Outside the home they take him swimming (which he loves), to gym training and out to afternoon teas with his friends.”

Work and play

Joseph also works four days a week at the Mudgee Shire Council’s recycling centre and one day a week doing coffee deliveries around town for a local café.

His active work and social life meant that even after he moved out of home his family had to do a lot of the drop-offs and pick-ups.

“We live on a property out of town and we both work, so to run backwards and forwards into Mudgee was always a bit of a drain,” Robyn says.

“Now it all gets sorted by the support workers. Joseph is so busy that we have to make appointments to see him!”

If there is one thing his family would like for Joseph, it would be for him to meet someone he could have a long-term relationship with.

“He’s very happy with where he is right now but it would be great if one day he finds someone he can share his life with,” Robyn says.

 

“Joseph is so busy now that we have to make appointments to see him!” (Robyn, Joseph’s mum)

Joseph’s NDIS supports have helped him:

  • Improve his self-confidence
  • Boost his independence
  • Engage more in the community
  • Rely less on his family

Social Futures is a National Disability Insurance Scheme Partner in the Community.
Our Local Area Coordination services connect participants to the NDIS in regional New South Wales.

To contact your nearest LAC call 1800 522 679

Read more participant stories

Wording up for a wider world

The world is making much more sense to Catherine Ryan since she was accepted onto the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).   The 33 year old lives in Orange and has experienced schizophrenia for as long as she can remember, disrupting her education and...

read more

From homebound to outward bound

Nicole was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in December 2009. She tells her story in her own words: I went to the doctor because I had three cold fingers and that's when I got the diagnosis. It was devastating. I was a full-time working mother and it seemed like...

read more

Tailored care helps Joseph spread his wings

Joseph's birthday in November last year was a double celebration - turning 40, and spending his first year as a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant.   He marked the occasion with a concert in front of 80 invited guests, singing covers of his...

read more

From hobby sketching to the Archibald Prize

When Zion Levy Stewart first started sketching people who visited his family home at age 20, everyone thought it might help him pass the time. Twenty years on, this National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant was an entrant in this year's 2019 Archibald...

read more

There’s no place like home

Just a few years ago, Tammy had reached the point of considering moving into supported accommodation due to the impact of her disability. The long-term Forbes resident was increasingly isolated and incapacitated by Devic’s disease, caused by the inflammation and...

read more

Get new stories from NDIS Participants in your inbox

* indicates required



Opportunity Pathways supports access to study and work

Opportunity Pathways supports access to study and work

young woman hanging hi-viz shirts on the line

Social Futures is offering a new program called Opportunity Pathways for Rent Choice recipients and social housing clients to help them access education, training and work in the Northern Rivers region.

The program offers flexible, personalised support to people who want to improve their employment options. Participants will have access to pre-employment training, employment support, post-employment support and housing independence services.

Anyone interested in the program can contact Jason McDonald, Program Manager on 0428 856 546 or by email [email protected].

Opportunity Pathways is a new initiative under Futures Directions in Social Housing NSW.

Read the FULL MEDIA RELEASE

Auslan signing comes to Byron Writers Festival

Auslan signing comes to Byron Writers Festival

This year the Deaf Community will have more access to the Byron Writers Festival, beginning with an Auslan-signed promotional video developed in collaboration with Social Futures’ Far North Coast (FNC) Ability Links.

The video features FNC Ability Links Co-Manager Sigrid Macdonald introducing the event and explaining the Auslan interpreting services that will be available during the festival, which runs from 2-4 August at Elements of Byron Resort. “It’s great to see Byron Writers Festival in the vanguard of public events realising the need to make themselves more accessible to people with disabilities, including members of the Deaf Community like myself,” Sigrid said.

Download the media release

In collaboration with:

 

‘Fight like a girl’ self-defence class sure to be a hit

‘Fight like a girl’ self-defence class sure to be a hit

Coach self defence training

Fight Like A Girl self-defence has come back to B-Space in Ballina for a six-week course starting 23 May 2019. This is a girls’ only class that builds confidence and empowers participants with useful skills in a safe and fun environment.
The course is being taught by Sensei Rachel Whiting, who has over 30 years’ experience teaching martial arts and self-defence. She is passionate about teaching girls the skills they need to keep themselves safe as the situation arises.

 

Download media release
Remembering Sorry Day …

Remembering Sorry Day …

the word sorry in the sky against sydney opera house

… and the impact of the Stolen Generations on all Aboriginal people in Australia. Our thoughts are with our staff, our participants, our wider communities and their loved ones. We remember and honour Elders past, present and those who are yet to come.

Sorry Day has been held annually on 26 May since 1998. It provides an important reminder for everyone in Australia to remember the past policies of forced child removal. On Sorry Day we reflect on the sad and painful history of the Stolen Generations and recognise moments of resilience, healing and the power of saying Sorry.

The first Sorry Day was held ten years after the publication of the Bringing Them Home report. However a report on government services, released by the Productivity Commission last year, said there were 17,664 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care in 2016-17, compared with 9,070 in 2007-08. So is sorry enough?

Read more about the Stolen Generations and the history of Sorry Day in this fantastic information sheet from Reconciliation Australia.

Patricia puts the circus behind her

Patricia puts the circus behind her

The circus in Patricia’s head started when she was a small child growing up in Sydney.

 

“Even before I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder I always knew something was wrong,” she says. “When I was very young I used to take days off school because I felt unwell, and from eight onwards I was hearing voices.

“Fortunately my mum was schizophrenic so she always understood where I was coming from. She’d allow me to stay at home and rest.

“To be honest she was my best friend.”

Patricia still experiences anxiety, depression and the occasional schizophrenic episode but has learnt to manage the highs and lows.

“When I was young it was just Mum and I who were affected but a lot of illness runs through our family and for my brother and two sisters, unfortunately it has hit later in life,” she says.

Drugs and alcohol

By her late teens Patricia had turned to drugs and alcohol to help cope with her mental illness, which ultimately left her bedridden.

“I was just a nightmare to know but luckily I met a GP who referred me to a psychiatrist, and as a result my condition was finally properly diagnosed,” she says. “So it was at that point that I got away from the drug dealers and moved back home, where my parents took me in and gave me all the help in the world.

“I went to Alcoholics Anonymous and with the support of older people in the group I was able to give up drink and drugs. I stayed with that group for 15 years and from the age of 26 I’ve been clean.”

Patricia only moved to NSW’s Northern Rivers when she was 40, initially on holiday.

A new home

“I had a breakdown in Byron Bay and the ambulance took me to Richmond Clinic in Lismore – and I’ve stayed here ever since.

“Some of the staff have become very close friends and continue to look out for me, they’re always checking in to see how I’m going. With their help I’ve been able to avoid another breakdown for 20 years.”

Patricia joined the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in 2017. She says it has made a really big difference to her outlook on life – especially with consistent support from Lorna, her Social Futures Local Area Coordinator.

“I’d been used to getting support through self-help groups involving people with similar mental health issues to my own, but my NDIS-funded carers are mostly all people with families from the mainstream and it’s just a much more positive vibe.

“I knew I needed the change to help with my recovery but I didn’t know how to go about it. Now that I’ve made the change I just feel I’ve entered a whole new chapter of my life. The NDIS came just at the right time.”

Out and about

Patricia’s support workers complement her existing social and church networks by taking her out for community activities, and also help maintain her flat with cleaning and maintenance as required.

She’s also able to use her plan funds to access therapeutic support and now goes on group tours with local NDIS provider Hart Tours.

“Once a month I go out with a group of old ladies (I’m the youngest one there!) and they are all so nice. We do a whole day tour in the bus going to places like Kingscliff, Mullumbimby, Pottsville, Ballina and so on – it’s just great getting back out into the countryside again.

“Now I’m thinking of volunteering and even looking for paid work – I’m only 63 after all!

“I thought I was going to become one of those weird people that you see around and now all of this has happened, it’s just been so positive and exactly what I needed.”

“I thought I was going to become one of those weird people that you see around and now all of this had happened, it’s just been so positive and exactly what I needed” (Patricia)

Patricia’s NDIS supports have helped her:

  • Re-engage in mainstream community life
  • Access therapeutic support
  • Go on group expeditions
  • Consider volunteer or paid work

Social Futures is a National Disability Insurance Scheme Partner in the Community.
Our Local Area Coordination services connect participants to the NDIS in regional New South Wales.

To contact your nearest LAC call 1800 522 679

Read more participant stories

Wording up for a wider world

The world is making much more sense to Catherine Ryan since she was accepted onto the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).   The 33 year old lives in Orange and has experienced schizophrenia for as long as she can remember, disrupting her education and...

read more

From homebound to outward bound

Nicole was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in December 2009. She tells her story in her own words: I went to the doctor because I had three cold fingers and that's when I got the diagnosis. It was devastating. I was a full-time working mother and it seemed like...

read more

Tailored care helps Joseph spread his wings

Joseph's birthday in November last year was a double celebration - turning 40, and spending his first year as a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant.   He marked the occasion with a concert in front of 80 invited guests, singing covers of his...

read more

From hobby sketching to the Archibald Prize

When Zion Levy Stewart first started sketching people who visited his family home at age 20, everyone thought it might help him pass the time. Twenty years on, this National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant was an entrant in this year's 2019 Archibald...

read more

There’s no place like home

Just a few years ago, Tammy had reached the point of considering moving into supported accommodation due to the impact of her disability. The long-term Forbes resident was increasingly isolated and incapacitated by Devic’s disease, caused by the inflammation and...

read more

Get new stories from NDIS Participants in your inbox

* indicates required



Pin It on Pinterest

Share This