Everybody’s Home releases petition for better housing in NSW

Everybody’s Home has released a petition to advocate for better housing conditions and support to access suitable housing across NSW.

The petition calls for support for first time house buyers, a better deal for renters, to address the 500,000 shortfall of suitable housing across NSW and a plan to end homelessness across NSW within the next ten years. 

Everybody’s Home has put together a plan for how our governments can fix the problem, but needs our leaders to take that plan and make it a reality. And the only way they’ll do this, is if they know that countless Australians are calling on them to do so.

Click here for more information about how you can support this petition.

 

Post expires at 2:01pm on Wednesday January 2nd, 2019

Assertive Outreach: Video on good practice in working with people who are sleeping rough

Homelessness NSW is very pleased to have supported the Assertive Outreach Community of Practice to develop a brief video on good practice in working with people who are sleeping rough. 

The video supports the implementation of the Assertive Outreach Guidelines.  It addresses how to engage people who are rough sleeping in a way that is trauma-informed and reflects good practice. The video was funded by Homelessness NSW and developed with the input and participation of assertive outreach practitioners. 

https://www.homelessnessnsw.org.au/industry-partnership/goal-1-service-quality-sustainability-and-good-practice/good-practice/good-1

The video accompanies the Assertive Outreach Good Practice Guidelines and Webinars that are also available on the Homelessness NSW website:

https://www.homelessnessnsw.org.au/industry-partnership/goal-1-service-quality-sustainability-and-good-practice/good-practice/good-1

 

Post expires at 11:58am on Tuesday April 2nd, 2019

Tweed Shire Council draft Homelessness Policy now on public exhibition

Following the review of its first homelessness policy, Tweed Shire Council has incorporated the learnings and now developed a new draft Homelessness Policy (version 2.0). Feedback is open until 13 November 2018.

Future work council will be doing includes developing a Community Development Strategy which will incorporate actions across a range of social issues.

The new draft policy; review snapshot and review executive summary can be found via the link below.

The council values your feedback and welcomes submissions up to 13 November 2018 in writing, via email to [email protected] or via the submission link found here: https://www.yoursaytweed.com.au/on-exhibition-draft-homelessness-policy

 

 

Post expires at 11:55am on Tuesday November 13th, 2018

Thinking about a granny flat? Factsheet provides Centrelink information

Are you thinking of adding a granny flat to your property to care for a family member or friend? COTA New South Wales has produced a fact sheet that can provide insight into how this will be deemed by Centrelink.

Centrelink will allow you to pay or transfer up to a certain amount of money to the person providing your granny flat, without affecting your pension entitlements. This is known as the reasonableness test amount. This amount is calculated on each individual’s age, and pension rate, plus an adjustable conversion factor.

See the Granny Flat fact sheet.

Post expires at 10:20am on Saturday November 3rd, 2018

Homelessness Awareness Week

Homelessness Awareness Week

Social Futures is the largest provider of Specialist Homelessness Services on the North Coast of NSW. We work with partners to provide a ‘no wrong door’ approach, so that anyone who needs help is supported. Sadly, more than 3,000 people access our Connecting Home service each year and almost a third of them are aged 16-24.

According to peak body Homelessness Australia :

  • The 2016 Census found that there were 116,000 Australians experiencing homelessness on Census night.
  • Two in every five homeless people are under the age of 25.
  • On any given night in Australia, 1 in 200 people are homeless/
  • The main causes of homelessness are poverty, unaffordable rents, and family violence/
  • Only 7% of those who were homeless on Census night were sleeping rough. The vast majority of homelessness is hidden people in crisis accommodation, rooming houses, caravan parks or overcrowded dwellings.
  • In 2016-2017, over 288,000 Australians sought assistance from Specialist Homelessness Services.

This year, Social Futures is supporting OTCP to present Homeless Connect Events in Lismore and Casino, providing lunch, haircuts, new clothes and emergency supplies to help the people in our communities facing homelessness this winter.

Homelessness Australia’s Everybody’s Home campaign aims to bring about an end to homelessness in Australia by 2030.

Find out more about homelessness in Australia.

 

Lismore Council Supporting Shop-top Living

Lismore City Council is calling for more landowners in the CBD to think about shop-top housing as a way to help diversify accommodation options in the city.

Deborah Ray, the owner of Music Bizarre, was one of the first people to take advantage of subsidies and support Council provided to encourage more shop-top housing in early 2016.

Deborah had put the plans on hold due to other commitments, and then the March 2017 flood hit. Instead of letting it slow her down, Deborah decided having a secure income would make her more flood resilient and got the renovations back on track.

This week her new one- and two-bedroom units are ready to hit the rental market, while above Music Bizarre she is putting the finishing touches to a new vinyl lounge and flood-free storage area.

The Lismore Housing Strategy identified CBD housing was integral to increase housing options in the city, and in 2015 Council brought together a focus group to look at barriers and issues related to shop-top housing.

As a result of feedback, Council resolved to waive Section 94 and 64 fees and on-site carparking for shop-top housing (subject to conditions) and to work closely with property owners to help them meet the necessary fire regulations, which can be complicated and costly.

“CBD shop-top housing is a great way to ensure we have smaller types of accommodation to cater for singles and couples, which is a growing demographic. The three-bedroom home is often not a model that suits the way people are living in the 21st century,” Council’s Strategic Planning Coordinator Paula Newman said.

“We know that shop-top housing will be a huge driver in revitalising our CBD and bringing life into our city. All cities should have people living in the heart of the retail precinct and it’s something we are very keen to progress. We are thrilled to see Deborah’s renovations completed and approved, and the result is fantastic. We hope to see many others follow her example and encourage people to contact Council if they are keen to investigate shop-top housing options.”

Anyone interested in pursuing shop-top housing should phone Council’s Economic Development Manager Tina Irish on 6625 0458.

Post expires at 11:29am on Sunday September 16th, 2018

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