How reflective practice can improve our aged care sector

How reflective practice can improve our aged care sector

Social Futures recently made a submission to the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety recommending all aged care workers are given the opportunity to participate in Wellness and Reablement Reflective Practice in order to continuously improve the quality of the care they provide.

Wellness and Reablement approaches support older people to maximise their independence and remain in their homes for as long as they can. Embedding Wellness and Reablement within this sector is a key goal for both the government and the broader aged care sector.

While most aged care workers are aware of Wellness and Reablement principles, many have not received formal training in the approach and are unclear how it relates to their individual work. Reflective practice is an important tool to enable aged care workers to successfully apply Wellness and Reablement in their practice. It provides a space for staff to think about how they work and practically apply Wellness and Reablement approaches to a range of relevant service delivery modes. The practice emphasises the value of their contributions while safely challenging any biases and assumptions they may hold.

Since Social Futures first piloted the concept in 2018, we have facilitated fifteen Wellness and Reablement Reflective Practice sessions with aged care workers in the Northern Rivers region. These participants reported that reflective practice is far more effective at integrating Wellness and Reablement into their day-to-day work than a traditional information session. Importantly, reflective practice allows for continuous learning and reassessment of skills, critical in changing established ways of working.

Social Futures offers free Wellness and Reablement Reflective Practice sessions for community aged care service providers in the Northern Rivers to help embed this approach within their service framework. Email [email protected] for more information or to book a session.

From bugs to hugs – life is looking up

From bugs to hugs – life is looking up

“She always wants to hug you! She hugs you 10 times in 10 minutes!” exclaims Broken Hill Local Area Coordinator Angela Turner, speaking of her National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant Marg.

Marg often drops by the Social Futures Office in Broken Hill for a social visit. She loves a chat. “I know all about her family and the goings on for Marg,” Angela says.

Marg (58) and her husband Tex (65) are long-time residents of Broken Hill. Marg has NDIS funding and supports in place to help with intellectual disabilities and hearing impairment.

 

 

Up until recently Marg and Tex were renting a house which was so decrepit, it had been condemned. They were there for more than 10 years. There was no air conditioning, it was poorly kept and it was making Marg ill.

“One day she came in crying,” recalls Angela. “Her son had had a child but he refused to bring him to the house to see her.

“Marg lifted her skirt and showed me her legs. She was covered in bites. You could see the sores on her. At night things were crawling all over her. I organised for a cleaner to go out but the quote was colossal, it was such a hideous mess. Marg begged us for help to find somewhere new.

“I had a chat with the agent and told them we included house and yard maintenance supports in Marg’s NDIS plan, and this is what got them over the line in the end. If they didn’t have the NDIS, they wouldn’t have gotten the property.”

The day the real estate agent told Marg and Tex they had a house, they were over the moon. They were at the agent’s office before noon for the 2.30pm viewing.

Their new home is in a nice part of town, close to the CBD, with easy access to transport, and it has air conditioning. All just in the nick of time for summer and for a family Christmas.

“I don’t think they ever thought they would get out of the house they were in.,” Angela says.

“Now they have a much happier and healthier standard of living.”

“We are just so excited to have a real home. It has a bath! And air conditioning! And a new stove! We couldn’t have done this without the help from the NDIS. We couldn’t be happier,” exclaims Marg.

Marg and Tex’s new home is having a few little touches made before they move in in the New Year. With funding from the NDIS the front access to the property will be widened to accommodate their scooter and bath feet are being added to help with safe entry to the bath.

When Marg first accessed the NDIS through Social Futures, she couldn’t hear. Her LAC made an appointment for her to have her ear drained and then to obtain a hearing aid. “She came in all excited because she could hear!” Angela says.

The future is looking so much brighter for Marg and Tex. Angela is now helping Marg to pursue a volunteer role at an Op Shop in the New Year.

“They’ve come a long way. And they’re happy. They are over the moon. Marg is so appreciative of the NDIS and so excited about her new home and her new life.”

 

 

 

 

“We are just so excited to have a real home. It has a bath! And air conditioning! And a new stove! We couldn’t have done this without the help from the NDIS. We couldn’t be happier.”

Marg

NDIS Participant

Using her NDIS plan

Marg’s NDIS supports have helped her:

  • achieve safe and comfortable housing
  • improve both her and her husband’s general health
  • improve her hearing and quality of life through a hearing aid
  • increase confidence and social connection through visits and experience at the Op Shop
  • improve access to family and social connections

Social Futures is a National Disability Insurance Scheme Partner in the Community.
Our Local Area Coordination services connect participants to the NDIS in regional New South Wales.

To contact your nearest LAC call 1800 522 679

Read more participant stories

From bugs to hugs – life is looking up

“She always wants to hug you! She hugs you 10 times in 10 minutes!” exclaims Broken Hill Local Area Coordinator Angela Turner, speaking of her National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant Marg. Marg often drops by the Social Futures Office in Broken Hill...

read more

Wording up for a wider world

The world is making much more sense to Catherine Ryan since she was accepted onto the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).   The 33 year old lives in Orange and has experienced schizophrenia for as long as she can remember, disrupting her education and...

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From homebound to outward bound

Nicole was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in December 2009. She tells her story in her own words: I went to the doctor because I had three cold fingers and that's when I got the diagnosis. It was devastating. I was a full-time working mother and it seemed like...

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Tailored care helps Joseph spread his wings

Joseph's birthday in November last year was a double celebration - turning 40, and spending his first year as a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant.   He marked the occasion with a concert in front of 80 invited guests, singing covers of his...

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From hobby sketching to the Archibald Prize

When Zion Levy Stewart first started sketching people who visited his family home at age 20, everyone thought it might help him pass the time. Twenty years on, this National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) participant was an entrant in this year's 2019 Archibald...

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Everyone Benefits From Inclusion

Everyone Benefits From Inclusion

Everyone Benefits From Inclusion

Social Futures LAC program staff were thrilled to work with the Murwillumbah Show Society and Tweed Shire Council to make sure people of all abilities had equal access to be part of the Murwillumbah Show. Watch our video discussing inclusion.

Everyone benefits when communities are inclusive.

Follow the below link to read about more stories from our NDIS program participants.

Or fill out the below form to connect with one of our local area coordinators to discuss how Social Futures and the NDIS can support you.

11 + 1 =

Interactive map highlights extent of poverty across regional NSW

Interactive map highlights extent of poverty across regional NSW

Regional communities in NSW are doing it tougher than their city dwelling counterparts. That’s the message from new research mapping social and economic disadvantage across the state released by the New South Wales Council of Social Services (NCOSS) today, echoing Social Futures concerns for the rural and regional communities we support.

With 888,000 people living in poverty in NSW, no community is immune to hardship, but our rural and regional communities are doing it particularly tough explained Chief Executive of Social Futures, Tony Davies.

“While only 30 per cent of the population live outside the metro areas in NSW, our regional communities are home to more than half of the people living in poverty across the state.

“There is a myth that our regional coastal communities in particular are an oasis of paradise but low incomes and high unemployment rates, coupled with high rates of housing stress, mean that many of these communities have significantly higher rates of poverty than the rest of the state. In Nambucca Heads for example, almost 1 in 4 people are living below the poverty line.

“Most concerning, children are the most likely age group to be living in poverty  with one in six children live below the poverty line. In some parts of Northern NSW this figure is closer to one in four.

“With many communities facing the additional bite of the drought it has never been more important for government to take real action to address the inequality in regional communities.

“We urgently need the government to invest in social housing, early childhood education and to raise the Newstart Allowance in order to break the cycle of poverty,” he said.

This report provides a detailed picture of the extent of disadvantage across NSW with interactive maps allowing users to explore how poverty impacts people in their region.

View the interactive map and read the full Mapping Economic Disadvantage in New South Wales report.

Clubhouse seeking volunteers

Clubhouse seeking volunteers

Do you want to inspire young people? 

We are on the lookout for energetic people to teach, encourage and inspire our members.

If you have skills and interests in fields like: Engineering, Robotics, Coding, Electronics, Science, Technology or Maths – the Lismore Clubhouse wants to hear from you!

Up to ten supported volunteer mentor positions are available where you can gain great experience teaching and working with young people. Volunteer times are also recognised by Centrelink.

About The Clubhouse

Part of an International Network of almost 100 Clubhouses in 19 countries worldwide, our Lismore based Clubhouse is the ONLY Clubhouse in regional Australia and one of only four in the country.

The Clubhouse delivers a free safe and creative after school space for young people, where mentors work to help them to explore their own ideas, develop skills, and build confidence through the use of technology.

Our Clubhouse encourages young people to think more positively and ambitiously about their futures. It has a positive impact upon attitudes to school, furthering education, and studying STEAM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics and Music).

We want our young people to reach their potential – can you help us?

You can commit to as little as 3 hours a week for six months as a Clubhouse Mentor (or by arrangement).

Benefits of Mentoring

  • The opportunity to explore your interests in a cutting edge environment
  • The opportunity to help young people build skills and confidence
  • Experience teaching and working with young people
  • Orientation to the Computer Clubhouse
  • Training as needed while mentoring

Contact us today!

If you are 19 years or older contact our Clubhouse Coordinator today on 0428 599 157 to discuss how you can help to inspire our next generation.

Creative passion rises above the flood

Creative passion rises above the flood

For Ability Links participants Mike Smith and Mathew Daymond, dreams came true on the first weekend in November when they were able to attend the prestigious Artstate 2018 Bathurst with the support of Ability Links Far North Coast (FNC).

The two men are artists with Lismore-based arts company RealArtWorks.Inc. Mike is a musician and songwriter who has been blind since birth, while Mathew is a visual artist and lives with schizophrenia. Both also have an intellectual disability, and both are passionate advocates for their community.

Artstate is a four-year project by Regional Arts NSW to shine a light on excellence in regional arts across the State. The Bathurst event was attended by arts practitioners, government bodies and people engaged in the creative industries across Australia, and showcased the best creative works that regional NSW has to offer.

Over the past two years Mike and Mat have co-led creative initiatives that were a direct response to the March 2017 floods that devastated Lismore. Working with RealArtWorks.Inc, Lismore City Council and Ability Links, the artists were part of ARCH (Arts Recovery Community Hub), facilitating free creative workshops for the community.

They helped develop ‘The Art of Doing Business’ in Lismore, a Creative Lismore and Lismore City Council initiative to reactivate flood-affected CBD shop spaces. Both were also key driving forces behind ‘The Overtopping Performance’, a series of community narratives about recovery and resilience that engaged over 100 local creatives and many more Ability Links participants.

Using their individual National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) funding packages, the artists have been able to develop their practice and be supported to travel and present their work outside their home on the Far North Coast.

Their presentation, ‘Creating Community Post-Disaster’, was flagged by Accessible Arts NSW as one of its three top picks for Artstate 2018. Mike and Mat were also the only artists with intellectual disability chosen to present at this year’s conference.

Mike on the left and Mathew (wearing glasses) on the right

Using an innovative technique of spoken word and braille, the men co-led sessions and presented the attendees with a poem (see below) that captured the discussions that happened in the room and that were particularly focused on the drought.

“It’s important for people to see and hear people with disability,” Mike says. “Many people still think people with disability can’t do things and they need to be helped to be better.

“But we can show you how we can help YOU build a better world, to be better people and to work together. Telling people’s stories through my music is a way we can understand each other and learn to be a better community of people.”

Both artists used the Artstate opportunity to meet and connect with other creatives and are currently working on a project that will be based in the NSW Central Tablelands, working with drought-affected farmers to tell their stories about community resilience.

Ability Links FNC is happy to support these men who are leading from the front, creating true social change through their practice.

 

POEM

Rural sights are the sound.

Rural sights are the sound

Art builds from the ground

Different communities have different ideas

See through eyes of each other

Does that make sense to you?

Everyone has got paint on them.

Paint the canvas of Life

Express yourself

Rain falls up from the sky

Words will rain from up high.

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